This list includes Spanish audio or video supplements so you can provide your student with many of the same language exposure and practice that bilingual speakers are exposed to in both languages – audio or video from native speakers is an important part of learning a language. Including these supplements can give your child a much more authentic and meaningful language experience. Add Songs or rhymesAudio or video from native speakers, ConversationVocabulary, ReadingWritingGames, CraftsSelf-reviewFun/ Student Choice, and Grammar.

Finally, once your child is ready, try out the Chinese Cross-Curricular Subjects and Other Fun Stuff.

CHINESE SUPPLEMENTS THAT ADD AUDIO OR VIDEO FROM NATIVE SPEAKERS

Lingotopia

Lingotopia is a new favorite game of my oldest child. The first day he played, he collected over 100 words (some new and some he already knew). Their official website description says that “Lingotopia is a language learning game about being lost in a city where you don’t speak the language.” I think the concept probably resonates with a lot of kids because my own kids have made up stories on their own about being lost in a city and having to learn the language to survive. At the time of this writing, it’s available in Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish, and seems to indicate that more languages are coming, including Greek.

Here is a little teaser trailer for the Lingotopia game:

 

Easy Languages YouTube Channel

Easy Languages YouTube Channel and website. Has short videos, around 5 minutes or so, in series covering many languages. French, Spanish, Polish, German, Russian, Arabic, Brazilian Portuguese, Korean, Japanese, Italian, Hindi, Mandarin (Chinese), Croatian, Cantonese, Thai, Ukrainian, Filipino (Tagalog), Hebrew, Hungarian, Indonesian, Swahili, Vietnamese, Malay, Swedish, Danish, Dutch, Mongolian, Miskito, and Serbian.

Ideas:

DVDs. Rent at the library or buy on Amazon for movies that you already know. Many DVDs have a Spanish or French soundtrack, but Arabic is harder to find. Be sure your DVD player can play them. You might need a region-free DVD player or some sort of DVD converter or reader.

YouTube. Older students can use this to subscribe to the YouTube channel, and/or find more foreign language channels on IHeartRadio, Pandora, or Podcasts that are related to YouTube channels. I am listing some channels here, but there are many more.

Mango

This is an online, free course. Our library has subscription so we’re able to get the full course for free. It is said to be for grade school through high school. The website describes the course as such, “Mango prepares learners for realistic conversations and strengthens everyday communication skills in over 70 world languages, including English.”

Beelinguapp

This is an app. Some stories are free, but you can pay for more stories if you want. It says you can “Learn Languages with Audio Books”. The app will read books aloud to you while you view both languages, which makes it much easier to figure out what you’re hearing. You can adjust the speed of the reading, go back and click on words you don’t know. Beelinguapp

“Free-to-Air” TV

You buy and install the satellite and receiver setup. After that, you can tune in to many foreign language channels broadcast from other countries. There is no monthly fee.
Here is an explanation: It Still Works.
The FTA List website has many tv channels, radio channels and podcasts produced by native speakers, for native speakers. You can search by language.
Galaxy 19
and
Galaxy 3c are the two largest foreign content satellites. You can watch some of the channels via the internet.

TuneIn Radio app

The TuneIn Radio app allows you to find podcasts and radio in foreign languages. It’s a great search feature.

Openculture.com

Free Podcasts at Openculture.com .

Blue’s Clue’s has been translated into 15 languages.

Be extremely careful searching this on YouTube because here are “fan dubs” that are probably not appropriate for children.

Rock and Learn, Learn A Language: Numbers, Colors & More (Spanish, French, Chinese, Italian, German & English)

Rock and Learn, Learn A Language: Numbers, Colors & More (Spanish, French, Chinese, Italian, German & English) DVDs in French, Russian, Korean, Spanish, German, Italian, Vietnamese, Chinese. These DVDs are basically like animated flash cards.

Yabla.com

Yabla.com says they have “Language Immersion with Authentic Video” It costs about $10/month at the time of this writing. Chinese, Italian, Spanish, French, German.

Fluentu.com

The Fluentu.com website says “FluentU brings language learning to life with real world videos!” It costs about $10/month right now. The videos have interactive captions. They have Chinese, Spanish, French, German, Japanese, Italian, Korean, Russian, Portuguese.

Watch Netflix or Amazon Prime movies in other languages – there is a language selector, sometimes subtitles available.

Watch Netflix or Amazon Prime movies in other languages – there is a language selector, sometimes subtitles available. Be very careful of content – other countries have different ideas about what is appropriate for children. Click on Audio and you can select the language. At the time of this writing Amazon Prime limits what languages you can access in the United States. There are also categories such as “French Language Children and Family Movies,” which will show movies that were originally in French, but not all movies that are available with French soundtrack. Spanish is the most common language available for me, but French, Portuguese and Chinese are reasonably available on Netflix. For example, Wakfu is a French cartoon available now on Netflix. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wakfu_(TV_series)

 

TripLingo

Their website says, “TripLingo is the ultimate tool for international travelers. Learn essential phrases, instantly translate your voice or connect to a live translator, get a crash course on the local culture and so much more.” There is a language package that has audio, includes slang, and can translate images. Good for planning a real or pretend trip. There are culture notes, travel tools that help with currency conversion, and a tip calculator. You could make a really fun project out of this.

Miaomiao Kidz

Miaomiao Kidz YouTube channel has a show that is mostly in English, but teaches some Chinese. It’s a great start for a beginner. I think it teaches a bit more Chinese than a show like Ni Hao Kai Lan (which is also a good way to start introducing Chinese).

 

Masha and the Bear

This is originally a Russian cartoon that has been redubbed in English and other languages.

Masha and the Bear in English (for reference).

Masha and the Bear in Chinese

Sesame Street in French and Chinese

Sesame Street – Elmo’s World – The Great Outdoors – French & Chinese

Peach Blossom Media

Peach Blossom Media YouTube channel has many cartoons in Chinese. Look for Taoshu and Friends. Most are better for intermediate to advanced.

Language Tree Chinese

Language Tree Chinese has multiple options available. DVD includes interactive game section.

Basic Spoken Chinese

Basic Spoken Chinese: An Introduction to Speaking and Listening for Beginners (Downloadable Media and MP3 Audio Included) (Basic Chinese) If you want a book format with a CD, Basic Spoken Chinese is a book that I have been able to follow. I can’t imagine starting my elementary school children in Chinese with this because it seems like it’s geared to high school or adult. However, I’ve been able to use it with my 10 year old who has already been studying written Chinese for four years. There are two books – Basic Spoken Chinese, and Basic Spoken Chinese Practice Essentials. There is are companion books on Basic Written Chinese.

Sesame Street Fun Fun Elmo

Sesame Street has a special program called Fun Fun Elmo.” These are not just regular Sesame Street episodes, these are cartoons specifically designed to teach Chinese. Each episode is about ten minutes long. There are 26 free episodes on YouTube

Pinyin Trainer by trainchinese

The Pinyin Trainer app description says, “Pinyin Trainer will help you master those tones using Pinyin, the standard romanization system for Mandarin Chinese. With almost 2,000 individual audio recordings and a variety of question-and-answer methods, it’ll keep you on your toes and improve your Chinese listening skills like nothing else. Plus, it’s got a complete guide to reading Chinese with the Pinyin system built right in.”

Chinese Class 101

The “101” classes are free, or you can sign up for premium classes at a cost of $4-$23 per month at this time. There is a lot of information available for free. It’s not too hard to navigate. A high school student could navigate it for free. https://www.youtube.com/user/chineseclass101

YoYo Chinese

Free videos on YouTube, and also a free YoYo Chinese website.

 

Chineasy

This started out as Chinese characters and has grown to include a lot more, including audio. There is a daily 7 minute Chineasy Podcast. The website has free lessons, or you can also pay for more features. The Chineasy app is good. There is a Chineasy Tiles | Play games to learn Mandarin Chinese! Easy and fun for children and adults. to help learn characters, but it’s pricey at $89, and it only covers 48 characters. I’d love the chance to try it out with my youngest child! You can order cheaper regular character tiles and use the Chineasy game ideas available here. The Chineasy Memory Game is not expensive, and neither are the regular books, like Chineasy: The New Way to Read Chinese. Chineasy writing has criticisms, and we haven’t personally used it a lot besides doing the Chineasy app, which my children enjoy. It looks like a fun way to do Chinese characters for a while, even if eventually you have to move on from it.

China Plus Website

The China Plus website has several series that provide lessons in Chinese. Living Chinese has 3-5 minute videos about visiting places in China: http://chinaplus.cri.cn/nihao/living-chinese/index.html; Takeaway Chinese has 25-minute videos about Chinese culture http://chinaplus.cri.cn/nihao/takeaway-chinese/index.html; Chinese Studio has 5-minute videos about daily life http://chinaplus.cri.cn/nihao/chinese-studio/index.html.

Language Treks

Podcasts from Language Treks.

Lingotopia

Lingotopia is a new favorite game of my oldest child. The first day he played, he collected over 100 words (some new and some he already knew). Their official website description says that “Lingotopia is a language learning game about being lost in a city where you don’t speak the language.” I think the concept probably resonates with a lot of kids because my own kids have made up stories on their own about being lost in a city and having to learn the language to survive. At the time of this writing, it’s available in Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish, and seems to indicate that more languages are coming, including Greek.

Here is a little teaser trailer for the Lingotopia game: